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> Poll: Safeties bad?, What is your opinion on Safety use?
Your opinion on safeties...
Do you use your safety?
Always! [ 35 ] ** [85.37%]
Only when children are around. [ 4 ] ** [9.76%]
Never. [ 2 ] ** [4.88%]
Have you ever been in a situation where your safety was a problem?
Yes. [ 5 ] ** [12.20%]
No. [ 36 ] ** [87.80%]
What is your view on the Safety?
It is handy at times. [ 26 ] ** [63.41%]
I hate it! [ 0 ] ** [0.00%]
I love it! [ 15 ] ** [36.59%]
Total Votes: 41
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Meety Peety
post Aug 2 2008, 03:48 PM
Post #21


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I always have my safety on when I have a round chambered. Yet another reason I am so in love with 1911s, easy access safety that I don't even have to think about. I have learned to raise my thumb during draw, which drags down the safety every time. I've also practiced a lot with drawing from a holster, disengaging the safety on draw, and firing as soon as I'm on target. It has become so routine that it isn't even a thought that passes through my mind. When I pick up the gun to fire, the safety is disengaged almost instantly, long before I even aim the gun without spending any extra time in the process.

With some other models, I honestly can't say that I would use the safety (Beretta, Sig) because they just are not in a convenient spot for me.

I think safety use goes hand in hand with ergonomics, and choosing the right weapon for your needs. I would never use a Beretta for the sole reason that I find it rediculously uncomfortable to engage the controls and that not something I want to deal with should I need to use it.


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Guest_Happyfeet_*
post Aug 20 2008, 03:51 AM
Post #22





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A safety is never an excuse for trigger control. Safeties can fail. Proper gun safety doesn't stop because the safety is on. /thread
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Alpha-17
post Sep 3 2010, 08:04 AM
Post #23


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Quite simply, I won't buy a gun that doesn't have a safety. It's one of my biggest complaints about the Glock, and one of the reason why I like 1911s. As for having problems with it, just practice drawing your sidearm, and thumbing the safety at the same time. Develop the muscle memory, and it won't be an issue.

This post has been edited by Alpha-17: Sep 3 2010, 08:04 AM
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Sniper2160
post Oct 29 2010, 10:21 AM
Post #24


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I own a Sig P220 Combat and Sig P226 both are DA/SA and neither have an external safety, what they do have is a firing pin block which is disengaged by pulling the trigger, also the fact that they can be decocked and are now completely safe.
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Comrade Hans
post Jan 2 2012, 11:36 PM
Post #25


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I don't think that safeties on a firearm are inherently good or bad. I do believe that some people rely upon them too much, and that becomes bad when it starts to replace common sense. Back in the day, I made the mistake of pulling the trigger on a rifle while the safety was engaged because I couldn't remember if it locked up the trigger of just disconnected it from the firing pin. Made a decent-sized crater in the ground in front of me. Lesson learned.

I do think they are useful, because once engaged, people who are not familiar with the battery of arms of that particular firearm (I think I used that term properly, if not, give me a heads up & I'll grab my Nomex pants) will not be able to operate the firearm. My younger brother is not familiar with how to operate an AR15-type weapon; I could hand him one with the selector on 'safe' and he would give up trying to shoot it after he found out that 'the trigger wasn't working right for some reason'. Same on an SKS or a Mauser 98-type rifle, most people who are not familiar with them (and would be more prone to causing an accident) wouldn't think to look for a safety where it's actually located, so they could pick up a fully loaded rifle of a similar type to those mentioned above, and not be able to use it as anything more than a club. For those of us who are vaguely familiar with different weapon systems, it wouldn't take too long to find the location of the safety by process of elimination (not on the bolt, not next to it, must be on the trigger guard). Just for the record, I do not advocate storing firearms loaded just because the safety is on.

I was taught that the first rule of firearms safety was to never point it at anything I did not intend to destroy. Or always keep it pointed in a safe direction. Or not point it at anything I didn't intend to shoot. Pick whichever version makes you feel the warmest and fuzziest inside. In that context, I always agree with having the safety on.

Specifically in the context of handguns, it gets a little confusing. I use a horizontal shoulder holster for a revolver. Therefore, if someone is standing behind me, technically I'm pointing it at them, and there isn't even a manual safety to engage. Bad? No, I don't think so. The hammer has to be cocked before it'll accidentally fall. If your particular firearm of choice can be carried with the hammer cocked, and you do so, I believe that you should engage a safety designed to block the hammer from striking the firing pin in the event that the sears slip and the hammer does fall. On a double-action automatic, if the hammer is not recessed and could be made to strike the firing pin should it hit the ground, a safety that only locks the trigger does no good. One that blocks the hammer (much like the single-action automatic situation above) would be appropriate. The poll was a little vague, I presume intentionally, but it really comes down to the individual firearm/situation when discussing mechanical safeties.
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Rivet
post May 24 2012, 05:22 PM
Post #26


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It really depends on the firearm in question. Long guns a must. A pocket snub-nosed revolver, of course, no.


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12g
post May 25 2012, 07:47 PM
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QUOTE (Rivet @ May 24 2012, 03:22 PM) *
It really depends on the firearm in question. Long guns a must. A pocket snub-nosed revolver, of course, no.

I agree, my xd does not have a manual safety, but there really is no way it could be fired in a hard cased holster. My idea is that I consider my holster to be the safety. That way when I draw my sidearm its ready to go.


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"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same" -R. Reagan
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